Apples and Sage Organic Wholefoods |

Roasted Romanesco with Whole Green Lentils and Quinoa

Ingredients:

1 head Romanesco (or Cauliflower)

1 tbsp Ghee or Coconut Oil, melted

1/2 cup Quinoa

1 cup Whole Green Lentils

1 tsp ground Cumin

1 tsp ground Cinnamon

1 tsp Fennel Seeds

1/2 tsp cracked Black Pepper

3 small Onions, sliced

2 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Zest of 1 Orange

2 tbsp fresh Orange Juice

2 tbsp fresh Lemon Juice

1/3 cup Parsley, chopped

1/3 cup Mint, chopped

Himalayan Sea Salt, fine

1 tsp Raw Honey

 

Method:

Preheat oven to 200C and line a baking tray with baking paper.

Cut the romanesco head into slices or break into florets and toss with ghee (or coconut oil) and salt. Arrange on the baking tray and roast for 20 – 30 minutes until slices have browned edges.  

Rinse and drain quinoa, putting it in a small saucepan. Add just under 1 cup water and fine sea salt, and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes until tender.

Rinse and drain lentils, putting these into another small saucepan with water and brining to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes until tender.

Heat ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add spices and pepper, cooking until fragrant. Add sliced onion and cook until lightly caramelised. Add cooked quinoa and lentils and stir to combine.

Whisk olive oil, orange zest and juice, lemon juice, chopped mint, chopped parsley, fine sea salt and raw honey together in a small bowl. Pour over romanesco, lentil and quinoa mix. r in a small bowl. Pour over romanesco, lentil and quinoa mix.  

 

Roasted Romanesco with Whole Green Lentils and Quinoa

Ingredients:

1 head Romanesco (or Cauliflower)

1 tbsp Ghee or Coconut Oil, melted

1/2 cup Quinoa

1 cup Whole Green Lentils

1 tsp ground Cumin

1 tsp ground Cinnamon

1 tsp Fennel Seeds

1/2 tsp cracked Black Pepper

3 small Onions, sliced

2 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Zest of 1 Orange

2 tbsp fresh Orange Juice

2 tbsp fresh Lemon Juice

1/3 cup Parsley, chopped

1/3 cup Mint, chopped

Himalayan Sea Salt, fine

1 tsp Raw Honey

 

Method:

Preheat oven to 200C and line a baking tray with baking paper.

Cut the romanesco head into slices or break into florets and toss with ghee (or coconut oil) and salt. Arrange on the baking tray and roast for 20 – 30 minutes until slices have browned edges.  

Rinse and drain quinoa, putting it in a small saucepan. Add just under 1 cup water and fine sea salt, and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes until tender.

Rinse and drain lentils, putting these into another small saucepan with water and brining to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes until tender.

Heat ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add spices and pepper, cooking until fragrant. Add sliced onion and cook until lightly caramelised. Add cooked quinoa and lentils and stir to combine.

Whisk olive oil, orange zest and juice, lemon juice, chopped mint, chopped parsley, fine sea salt and raw honey together in a small bowl. Pour over romanesco, lentil and quinoa mix. r in a small bowl. Pour over romanesco, lentil and quinoa mix.  

 

Recipe: Roasted Pumpkin with Kale, Grilled Halloumi and Dukkah


Autumn brings with it perfect seasonal produce perfect for stews, soups and warm wintery salads. Try your hand at our roasted pumpkin and kale salad, served with grilled halloumi and dukkah. It is an absolute autumn winner!

 

Ingredients:

1 large Butternut Pumpkin

2 Garlic Cloves

1 tbsp Ghee or Coconut Oil, melted

Pinch Himilayan Sea Salt, fine

Pinch Cracked Black Pepper

1 small bunch Kale

Splash Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Juice of 1/2 lemon

200g Halloumi Cheese

Handful Fresh Mint, chopped

Dukkah:

1 tbsp ground Coriander

1 tbsp ground Cumin

1 tbsp cracked Black Pepper

1 cup raw Hazelnuts

1/2 cup Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Himalayan sea salt, fine

 

Method:

Preheat oven to 200C.

Cut pumpkin in half and remove skin, scooping out the seeds and cutting the pumpkin into cubes. Toss the pumpkin and minced garlic with ghee (or coconut oil) in a baking dish, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, roll kale into cigar shapes and slice into ribbons. Put the kale in a large bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt and lemon juice. Massage the kale together using your hands for 2 minutes.

For the dukkah; toast hazelnuts in a frying pan over medium heat for 10 – 15 minutes until fragrant. Remove from heat and cool, rubbing the nuts together to remove skin. Toast sesame seeds for 2 minutes and cool. Add the hazelnuts and sesame seeds to a food processor and pulse until you have a chunky texture. Add the spice mix, salt and nut mix together.

Cut the halloumi into thin slices. Heat a grill pan (or frying pan on high heat) and add the halloumi until golden brown on both sides.

Add the roasted pumpkin and kale, and top with grilled halloumi. Garnish with fresh mint, olive oil and dukkah. 

 

*Recipe inspired by My New Roots 

Recipe: Roasted Pumpkin with Kale, Grilled Halloumi and Dukkah

Ingredients:

1 large Butternut Pumpkin

2 Garlic Cloves

1 tbsp Ghee or Coconut Oil, melted

Pinch Himilayan Sea Salt, fine

Pinch Cracked Black Pepper

1 small bunch Kale

Splash Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Juice of 1/2 lemon

200g Halloumi Cheese

Handful Fresh Mint, chopped

Dukkah:

1 tbsp ground Coriander

1 tbsp ground Cumin

1 tbsp cracked Black Pepper

1 cup raw Hazelnuts

1/2 cup Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Himalayan sea salt, fine

 

Method:

Preheat oven to 200C.

Cut pumpkin in half and remove skin, scooping out the seeds and cutting the pumpkin into cubes. Toss the pumpkin and minced garlic with ghee (or coconut oil) in a baking dish, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, roll kale into cigar shapes and slice into ribbons. Put the kale in a large bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt and lemon juice. Massage the kale together using your hands for 2 minutes.

For the dukkah; toast hazelnuts in a frying pan over medium heat for 10 – 15 minutes until fragrant. Remove from heat and cool, rubbing the nuts together to remove skin. Toast sesame seeds for 2 minutes and cool. Add the hazelnuts and sesame seeds to a food processor and pulse until you have a chunky texture. Add the spice mix, salt and nut mix together.

Cut the halloumi into thin slices. Heat a grill pan (or frying pan on high heat) and add the halloumi until golden brown on both sides.

Add the roasted pumpkin and kale, and top with grilled halloumi. Garnish with fresh mint, olive oil and dukkah. 

Recipe: Roasted Pumpkin with Kale, Grilled Halloumi and Dukkah


Autumn brings with it perfect seasonal produce perfect for stews, soups and warm wintery salads. Try your hand at our roasted pumpkin and kale salad, served with grilled halloumi and dukkah. It is an absolute autumn winner!

 

Ingredients:

1 large Butternut Pumpkin

2 Garlic Cloves

1 tbsp Ghee or Coconut Oil, melted

Pinch Himilayan Sea Salt, fine

Pinch Cracked Black Pepper

1 small bunch Kale

Splash Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Juice of 1/2 lemon

200g Halloumi Cheese

Handful Fresh Mint, chopped

Dukkah:

1 tbsp ground Coriander

1 tbsp ground Cumin

1 tbsp cracked Black Pepper

1 cup raw Hazelnuts

1/2 cup Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Himalayan sea salt, fine

 

Method:

Preheat oven to 200C.

Cut pumpkin in half and remove skin, scooping out the seeds and cutting the pumpkin into cubes. Toss the pumpkin and minced garlic with ghee (or coconut oil) in a baking dish, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes until tender.

Meanwhile, roll kale into cigar shapes and slice into ribbons. Put the kale in a large bowl and drizzle with olive oil, salt and lemon juice. Massage the kale together using your hands for 2 minutes.

For the dukkah; toast hazelnuts in a frying pan over medium heat for 10 – 15 minutes until fragrant. Remove from heat and cool, rubbing the nuts together to remove skin. Toast sesame seeds for 2 minutes and cool. Add the hazelnuts and sesame seeds to a food processor and pulse until you have a chunky texture. Add the spice mix, salt and nut mix together.

Cut the halloumi into thin slices. Heat a grill pan (or frying pan on high heat) and add the halloumi until golden brown on both sides.

Add the roasted pumpkin and kale, and top with grilled halloumi. Garnish with fresh mint, olive oil and dukkah. 

 

*Recipe adapted from My New Roots 

Have a Warm Wakeup with Oats

With the cold weather starting up and winter just mere months away, oats are the perfect breakfast choice for those wanting to wake up to a satisfying, warm start to the day.

 

Yet with so many types of different oats to choose from, it can be downright confusing trying to pick the best type of oat for you. We’ll take you through all you need to know about the grain, from how each oat style is made and what oat type is best for you:

Oat Bran:

 

Oat Bran is first part of the grain to be processed. It is ground from the hull that covers the oat groat (or oat kernel) and is packed full of protein, iron, magnesium and many more essential vitamins. High in dietary fiber, oat bran is easy to digest and is a great breakfast choice.  

Oat Groat:

 

Oat groats, also known as oat kernals, are what exist inside the hull of the oat. Oat groats are similar to cooked rice with a slight nutty flavor, but will take over an hour to cook unlike rice.

Steel-Cut Oats:

 

When the oat groat has been cut into pieces, this is steel-cut oats. The texture of these oats are chewy and creamy, taking about 15 minutes to cook on the stovetop.

Stabilised Rolled Oats:

 

Steaming, then rolling the oat groat creates stabilised rolled oats. This process partially cooks the oat groat, creating a faster cook time with a thick, creamy texture. These are the most common type of oats using in baking and hold their form quite well.

Unstabilised Rolled Oats:

 

Unstabilised oats are created by rolling the raw oat groat but are not subjected to steaming, hence the name. The oat groat is rolled after hulling making sure the oat retains the high vitamin content and nutritional value.

Quick Rolled Oats:

 

Quick rolled oats are the most processed form of the oat grain and are usually what you’ll buy in the prepackaged cereal section at the supermarket. Quick oats are very quick to cook as the name suggests as they are rolled thinner creating a flatter oat than the traditional rolled oats.

 

Luscious and Leafy Swiss Chard

Luscious, leafy greens have always been the ultimate source of nutrients, hosting a long list of health benefits vital to our health and wellbeing. 

With its large fanned leaves and rainbow stalks, Swiss chard (and its relative Silverbeet) are no exception to this. With the ability to help regulate blood sugar levels, aid digestion, combat inflammation and help detoxify, these leafy super vegetables are excellent additions to your next salad or stew.

Swiss chard are native to the Mediterranean and share a similar flavour to spinach with a taste more bitter and strong with earthy hints.

The benefits of Swiss chard are unbelievably impressive harbouring essential vitamins K, C and E; minerals such as magnesium, manganese, potassium and iron; and a significant amount of antioxidants and enzymes.

With their crisp green leaves and salty bitterness, these vivid veggies are perfect in pies and quiches, or venture out and try a stir-fry or curry. The possibilities are endless for Swiss chard.  

 

Swiss Chard and Root Vegetable Curry 

500g Swiss Chard or Silverbeet, chopped including stalks

2 tbls Sunflower Oil

1 large knob of Ginger

1 Red Chilli, chopped finely or 1 tsp Chilli Flakes

3 Garlic cloves, peeled and smashed

1 Onion

1 tsp Garam Marsala

1 tsp Mustard Seeds

1 tsp Turmeric

1 tsp Cumin

6 Cardamom Pods or 1/2 tsp ground

350g Nicola Potatoes, skin on and cubed

1 Large Sweet Potato

1 Bunch Dutch Carrots

4 Tomatoes, chopped

1 Bunch Coriander, torn

Salt and Pepper to taste

250g Full Fat Plain Yoghurt (Optional)

Handful of Roasted Cashews or Sunflower Kernels

 

Sautee garlic, ginger and onion until soft. Add spices and stir.

Add potatoes, carrots and tomatoes, stir.

Add 1 1/2 cups water, stir and cover until cooked through. Add chard and stir until chard is wilted, season with salt and pepper.

Stir through yoghurt if using and top with coriander and nuts or seeds. 

Get Acquainted with the Quince

Quince, the distant relative of family favourites the apple and pear, these fragrant fruits tend to be a little more mysterious in the kitchen.

A delicacy that is slowly becoming more uncommon in conventional cooking, the quince is commonly used in jams, jellies and preserves, yet the fruity aroma of these yellow pome-fruits lends itself to liven up even summery salads and wintery soups.

Packed full of dietary fibre and rich in mineral content such as iron, copper and potassium, quince is said to help improve digestive health, reduce inflammation and stimulate circulation.

With a sweet perfume and a floral finish, the ancient quince can add a vibrant layer of flavouring to many recipe staples. So go on, explore the quince in all its glory!

 

Walnut and Poached Quince Salad

(Adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty)

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups water

1 ½ cups raw sugar

Zest of ½ orange

2 bay leaves

Juice of ½ lemon

200ml red wine

2 large quinces

200g mixed salad leaves

70g roasted walnuts 

Dressing: 

1 tsp mustard

2 tsp apple cider vinegar

4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

Method:

Preheat the oven to 140C.

Put water, sugar, orange zest, bay leaves, lemon juice and red wine in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Stirring until the sugar has dissolved.

Next peel the quince and cut into quarters, and then cut the quarters into halves. Place the quince into the saucepan, cover and put the pan in the oven.

After 1 ½ hours, test to see if the quince is tender with a knife, if not, leave in oven for another half hour. Remove from oven and cool.

To make the dressing, mix together all the ingredients, adding salt and pepper to taste.

To serve, place mixed salad leaves on a serving platter and add the quince on top. Drizzle over the dressing and sprinkle walnuts on top.

Ten Tips and Recipes to Deal with Picky Eaters

Food, glorious food. You love it and you want your children to love it too. Not only that, but you also want them to love the healthy stuff as well, right? Here are 10 tips to help your kids be less picky, plus three delicious and healthy recipes to get you started.

 

1.    At least one new thing: At least weekly, add one new food on their plate, but make sure there’s also something else on there that they like to eat. This way they get exposed to more foods early, which may also seem less threatening when another well-loved and familiar food is also on the plate.

2.    Encourage ‘food play’: Kids love to use their hands. So encourage them to explore a new food with their senses — to pick it up, touch it and smell it — so that it becomes more familiar and more fun!

3.    Take just a taste: At least ask you child to “take just a taste.” And if they refuse, don’t make a big deal out of it or force them to try; your efforts may backfire and turn your kid off the food for good.

4.    Keep serving it up: Just because your child refused a food the first time, don’t give up. Continue to serve up the new food on different occasions. It can take quite a few occasions before your picky eater even pops the new food into their mouth.

5.    Prepare the food in a different way: Maybe steamed carrots aren’t their thing, but they can’t get enough of raw, crunchy carrots? Perhaps grated or small veggies pieces in a sauce or stew are more enticing than larger, harder-to-chew chunks? It may be that they like Brussels sprouts roasted or pan-fried instead of boiled?

6.    Involve them: Kids develop their sense of individuality quite young, and want to do things by themselves and in their own way. The earlier you involve them in preparing food, the better; they’re more likely to try it. Get them to help you plate the food and help you in the kitchen (even a three-year-old can stir fruit into yogurt or spread nut butter on bread). If you have a veggie patch or herb garden, get them to grow something and help you to look after it.

7.    Make it fun: Kids are more likely to eat real food if you’ve made it look fun and colourful. For example, cut vegetables into cute shapes or use them to make shapes on a plate (like a face). Buy a lunch box with their favourite character on it and stickers that you can stick onto their lunch bags.

8.    Talk it up, big time: Kids love to copy adults; so put some food on your plate and exaggerate: “Yummy! Mum loves [insert food name]! Do you want to try it?” Eventually, your kid may be brave enough to try it.

9.    It’s all in a name: For kids, use names that are fun and hone into their imagination. For example, it’s not a green smoothie; it’s a green monster smoothie. It’s not broccoli; it’s a baby tree. Create names using their favourite TV characters, toys or books.

10.  Substitute it: Kids also love things like burgers, pizzas and pies – and any type of sweet treat, of course! Buy cookbooks and print recipes from blogs that have recipes of healthier, wholefood versions of kids’ favourites. Here are three to get you started.

 

Lettuce Boats

Recipe adapted from Raw Food 4 Kids by Sarah Nolan-Quinney

Serves 2 to 4

·         1 cup walnuts or sunflower seeds

·         1 cup of mushrooms

·         1 tbsp linseed oil

·         1 tbsp cumin powder

·         2 tsp coriander powder

·         pinch of Himalayan sea salt

·         lettuce leaf cups, for serving

·         raw salad vegetables, for serving

·         tahini (sesame seed butter), for serving

Except for the lettuce leaves, place all ingredients into a food processor and process into small pieces – ensuring the mixture has texture.

Place mixture into lettuce leaf cups and sprinkle with raw vegetables of your choice, such as chopped tomatoes, sliced avocado, grated carrot and cucumber.

Drizzle with tahini.

 

Sweet Potato Burgers

Recipe from I Quit Sugar For Life by Sarah Wilson

Serves 2 to 4

·         1 large sweet potato, cut into rounds

·         1 large tomato, sliced

·         olive oil

·         ½ avocado

·         cream cheese

·         handful snow peas, slivered

Bake sweet potato rounds coated in a little olive oil and salt at 220C for 20 minutes.

Cool, then spread with avocado, cheese and snow peas cut in slivers.

Use slices of tomato as the burger buns.

 

Flower-Power Eggs

Recipe from I Quit Sugar For Life by Sarah Wilson

Serves 4

·         1 small capsicum (any colour)

·         coconut oil

·         4 eggs

Cut the capsicum into four 1.5cm rings and place in a lightly oiled pan over a low heat.

Crack an egg in the middles of egg capsicum ring, then cover and cook until done.

 

*Both cookbooks mentioned are sold in store and come highly recommended by us!

 

A Recipe to Choc-Up Your Valentine's Day and Our Favourite Chocolate Brands

Ahhh, chocolate. Bitter–sweet like love, no?

Chocolate is one of the most romantic and fail-proof gifts you can give on Valentine’s Day. And since this day for lovers is just around the corner, we’re sharing our favourite and wholesome brands. Yes, chocolate can be choc-full of goodness and tasty, too! Especially if you choose the dark, rich and, um, unadulterated kind – one that is mostly made of organic cacao butter, organic cacao powder and unrefined sugar (e.g. coconut sugar, maple syrup or evaporated cane sugar).

 

Brands which fit the bill – and which we absolutely love! – include locally made Pana Chocolate and Liefje. We’re also particularly smitten by Conscious Chocolate and Alter Eco.

 

But, if you’d like to go an extra step and make your own chocolate for your lover, then here’s a winning recipe from The Mindful Foodie. You’ll find we have all the ingredients in store.

 

Homemade Chocolate Recipe

·         1/3 cup (35 g) cacao butter, roughly chopped

·         ¼cup (45 g) cold pressed coconut oil

·         2 tbsp (40 ml) maple syrup*

·         ¼ cup (18 g) cacao powder

·         any fillings you’d like – such as activated nuts, seeds, goji berries, shredded coconut

·         a chocolate mould, tiny cupcake moulds, or a small tray of choice

*use stevia drops to taste for a sugar-free chocolate

 

Make enough space in your freezer to place your mould or tray so that it lays flat.

Line mould with your choice of fillings (we placed a single roasted hazelnut in each of heart).

Melt the cacao butter in a heat-proof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water (the bowl should not touch the water). Leave the bowl over the saucepan, but turn the heat off once the butter has melted.

In a small pot, gently melt the coconut oil over very low heat and stir in the maple syrup.

Pour the coconut–maple mixture into the melted cacao butter

Gently whisk in the cacao powder until there are no lumps and every ingredient is thoroughly combined (the maple syrup tends to sink to the bottom).

Working quickly (stir the mixture again if needed), pour the chocolate into your mould, and place in the freezer immediately, for about 30 minutes.

Turn out from mould. If used a tray, break your chocolate into bite-sized shards.

Store in an airtight container in the fridge.

Savour your chocolate a little at a time.